Diabetes, as a Pathocomplex Process 

 

In Greek, the word diabetes literally means "passing through" (implying excessive diuresis in patients with diabetes mellitus). This term has been used since ancient times until, in 1776, the English Dr. Dobson first identified its sweetness by tasting the urine of diabetic patients. From that time on, the term diabetes was appended with sweet or sugary, giving rise to diabetes mellitus. Yet, scientifically, sugar’s presence in the urine was proven only in 1841. 

Then, in 1889, during a microscopic study, Mr. Langerhans discovered certain pancreatic islands that were later named in his honor as islets of Langerhans. At the time, their function as insulin producing regions in the glands was yet to be determined. In the same year, scientists Minkowski and von Mering succeeded in artificially evoking diabetes mellitus in laboratory animals and thus, proving that increased sugar levels were complications of pancreatic dysfunctions.

In 1921, by crushing the pancreas and secreting its extract, Banting and Best obtained a substance that they called insulin (derived from the Latin world insula for island, referring to the islets of Langerhans). By introducing this substance to dogs that were artificially affected with diabetes, they were able to reduce their sugar levels. A year later, they used this insulin for treating an individual with diabetes mellitus.

Albuminous origin of the insulin molecule was discovered and its sequence of amino acids was determined in 1960. This was the first protein to have its sequence completely decoded by people. In 1976, human insulin was produced from pork insulin for treating patients suffering from diabetes mellitus, whereas in 1979, the insulin molecule was successfully created via artificial synthesis. Once insulin was first used for treating diabetic patients in 1922, it appeared for a while as if the problem of diabetes mellitus was solved once and for all. Only in 1969, did the doctors realize that insulin administration in the treatment of diabetes mellitus not only failed to eliminate this disease, but was powerless even in discouraging such complications of diabetes mellitus as angiopathy, nephropathy, cardiomyopathy, encephalopathy, retinopathy, and preventing the occurrences of hypertension, strokes, and heart attacks. 

Trophic ulcer in diabetes
Trophic ulcer in diabetes

According to our understanding, diabetes is a pathocomplex process. In this condition, the pancreas is damaged by the pathocomplexes causing a deficiency of insulin. The sugar itself plays no role in the pathology of diabetes. Blood sugar levels rise for the purpose of increasing urine output to help the body to get rid of the pathocomplexes with the urine.

In the case of diabetes, the human body activates a special function of the defense mechanism in the form of polydipsia (utilizing lots of water) and polyuria (increased urination). Blood sugar levels rise in compensation following a dysfunction of the pancreas and mechanisms of insulin neutralization. With this mechanism of defense, the human body tries to remove accumulated pathocomplexes – the main damaging factors out of the body by means of increased diuresis. The presence of circulating pathocomplexes in the circulatory system on the one hand and adopted in conventional medicine replacement therapy on the other hand result in an anatomical damage of the pancreas that causes patients’ dependence on exogenous insulin.

As of today, the pathocomplex theory is the best scientific explanation of the origin of diabetes in the humans.

Our method is mostly intended for treating the consequences of diabetes such as vascular lesions, lesions of the retina, brain, heart, etc.

Complete treatment of trophic ulcers with our method
Complete treatment of trophic ulcers with our method